Home Gadget Geeks

Drobo S, Computer Recycling, Upgrading Your Internet, No More Landline, HD Home Run Prime – HT049

Jim and Andrew are joined by Gary Johnson at The Average Guy for this week’s installment of the Home Tech Podcast. After the introductions, and weather reports from around the world, the guys kick off the show, talking about Jims’ search for a miniature computer to match to a Drobo S, and run Windows Home Server 2011. Gary warns against small form factor machines that can trap heat inside the case, and recommends using a drive such as the Seagate Momentus XT for a system drive for performance gains. Listen LIVE every Thursday night at @ 6pP/8pC/9pE Listen Mobile: The guys talk about PC recycling programs – Andrew talks about the PC’s for Kids program that runs in Australia, which donates computers to children who are physically, mentally or economically handicapped.  From the chat, we get recommendations of Freecycle, a global organization who are all about “giving (and getting) stuff for free in their own towns.”  Jim recycles his old equipment through Best Buy.  Remember, if you are recycling a PC, that you either remove and destroy the hard drive, or use a program such as DBAN or Secure Erase to securely erase your data before recycling a PC if you don’t want to, or don’t know how to remove the hard drive. Andrew talks about the possibility of upgrading his home Internet connection, moving from an ADSL 8 mbps connection to a Cable connection at 30 mbps. While talking about in-house services, Jim tells us that he has finally disconnected the phone line in his family home.  The guys discuss the price benefits of VOIP vs land lines, and the various providers and methods for saving on phone bills. The guys talk about the upcoming change of IP addressing from the current IPV4 standard to the new IPV6 system.  Jim talks about a new concept being thought about, being the building of a network in space, to ultimately allow network connectivity for space craft – watch this space! Gary gives an update on the HD Home Run Prime he purchased a couple of months back, from Silicon Dust, and some of the issues that he and his family are seeing when they try to stream video over their wireless network, versus working perfectly on the wired network. The guys talk briefly about some late breaking news, relating to HP retaining the Personal Systems Group, as reported by our friends over at ZDNet, and the potential for the HP Touchpad to run Windows 8, as is also being rumored around the Internet. Gary talks about the increase in hard drive prices that have been since the the Japan Tsunami and the more recent flooding in Thailand, where most of the hard drives on the market are manufactured. The guys talk some more about the recent word added to the Urban Dictionary last week by Rich O’Neil, being The Full Fo-Shay. The guys talk about some of the rumored upcoming mobile phone devices such as the ASUS Transformer 2, and an article Gary has found talking about 18 TB drives being made possible using table salt! Be sure to listen to the show after the music finishes, to hear about Mike Howards’ recent Windows Home Server 2011 adventures! Don’t forget our feed location has changed – click on to update your iTunes library, or for other Podcast downloading applications, please click on the RSS Feed and pick your Pod Catcher of choice! Facebook Page: Facebook Group: If you’d like to subscribe to the show, click on  to update your iTunes library, or for other Podcast downloading applications, please click on the RSS Feed and pick your Pod Catcher of choice! Or, you can now stream the show online at at The Show Announcements and Schedule: Jim’s Twitter: Andrew’s Twitter: Contact Christian: Contact the show at Find us on Facebook: Find this and other great Podcasts from the Average Guy Network at
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Drobo

The Home Tech Podcast: Drobo Special from San Jose, CA

Listen to the Podcast: Listen Mobile: Jim is with Mario Blandini from Drobo and a visit to their international headquarters in San Jose for the first ever Home Tech Podcast from Drobo.  Mario and Jim talk about Drobo product direction, hardware vs software development, RAID usage and even some new product announcements!  Drobo is now shipping a new 12 bay Drobo for enterprise business that need more storage. Mario also breaks down some of the new naming convention for the latest line and talks about the future of expanding Drobo’s BeyondRAID technology.  He also covers some of the future when it comes to using smaller form factor drives and responds to the hacking community.  Jim gives Mario some ideas of what he would like to see in the future including some tips for the Home Server Community. Mario also announces the first ever Drobo on Windows Home Server 2011 Add-in challenge.  If you are a Windows Home Server Add-in developer and write a successful add-in for the WHS 2011 platform that manages a Drobo unit, Drobo will reward you with one!  For details, watch for the “official announcement” over at the after Wednesday night’s live show (10/12/2011) Love it or $$$$ it, this is a show you will not want to miss. Jim’s Twitter: #!/jcollison Andrew’s Twitter: #!/unrealshots Contact Christian: Contact the show at Find us on Facebook: If you have a product or a topic you would like us to discuss, please tag your articles in Delicious using the tag “TheAverageGuy”. Find this and other great Podcasts from the Average Guy Network at
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Home Gadget Geeks

Drobo HQ in San Jose, Disk Defragmenting, In-flight Internet Access, Steve Jobs and Weather Stations – HT046

Jim and Andrew and Christian are joined by Bill Paulmenn for this week’s installment of the Home Tech Podcast. For those of you hearing the show via iTunes or your podcatcher of choice, thanks for switching feeds – if your friends are missing this episode, please remind them to switch to the new feeds – the link is below! Christian is back this week, taking a break from the school work for an hour or two, catching some time for technology! Listen Mobile: After some updates from Bill and Christian, Jim tells us about his trip to the San Francisco Bay Area to visit Oracle World, and his visit to Drobo – watch out for the podcast that Jim recorded with Mario Blandini from Drobo while he was visiting.  Jim tells us about the performance of in-flight Internet access on his flight, a great way to be able stay online whilst in a flight, and not have to resort to reading a book while flying! Andrew joins late, and the guys pay tribute to the passing of Steve Jobs, and discuss the amazing contributions he made to the technology world.  For those of you who wonder just how much of a contribution Steve Jobs made to the world of technology, the New York Times listed the patents registered with him as an inventor. From Christians’ Corner, Christian brings us Disk Defrag from Auslogics, which Christian recommends as it is more efficient and has more features than the built-in Windows Defrag. Christian talks about the benefits of running Check Disk following an unexpected power shutdown to help avoid File System corruption. The guys go on to talk about the benefits of installing device drivers from the hardware vendor, instead of installing the default drivers that come from Windows Update.  Christian and Bill give some tips on how to find the correct driver for the hardware you have installed using Google. Christian remind us to use to review the applications that automatically start with Windows – take a look at what is automatically starting on your PC – if  you disable the apps you don’t use on a regular basis, your PC will boot up faster.  Christian also talks about speeding up your PC using various tips and tricks, as well as checking the performance of your hard disk using HD Tune Pro.  You can always check the startup time of your PC using the following script from Seven Forums. Christian talks about some of the performance issues that have been seen in older versions of Mozilla Firefox – if you are using Firefox, and finding that your PC is a little sluggish, make sure you upgrade to the most recent version. This weeks’ Deal-of-the-Week is the Seagate 3TB XT from , which runs out at $ when used with the coupon code EMCKAHA26 at checkout. Andrew returns from greeting the in-laws, and talks for a while about the trip they are having with their caravan in tow.  The guys talk about road trips and technology for uploading images when on the road. Jim and Andrew talk about the potential of moving from an Android  phone to an Apple iPhone, and the reasons why they would move over. To close out the show, the guys talk about Bills’ weather station, and the Davis Vantage Pro2™ hardware, and options that Bill has added onto the unit, and why he uses it. Don’t forget our feed location has changed – click on to update your iTunes library, or for other Podcast downloading applications, please click on the RSS Feed and pick your Pod Catcher of choice! Facebook Page: Facebook Group: If you’d like to subscribe to the show, click on  to update your iTunes library, or for other Podcast downloading applications, please click on the RSS Feed and pick your Pod Catcher of choice! Or, you can now stream the show online at at The Show Announcements and Schedule: Jim’s Twitter: Andrew’s Twitter: Contact Christian: Contact the show at Find us on Facebook: Find this and other great Podcasts from the Average Guy Network at
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Back Up / Storage

Drobo Dashboard 2.0 Continued: Tools, Drobo Copy, Dashboard Preferences and Some Final Thoughts

I have been reviewing a Drobo in some form or fashion since December #160; Some reviews over at the Home Server Show and some here at the Average #160; The first part of this review can be found at Drobo Has a New Dashboard! Welcome Version with a Drobo S and 5 Drives  In recent months, Drobo has released a new version of their dashboard ( updated for this review) for both their consumer and enterprise #160; For a company that is taking steps in the right direction when it comes to back up hardware, this software upgrade replaces a fairly vanilla offering from the last several #160; It’s a definite upgrade and one that users of a Drobo should test out #160; I found no reasons not to #160; If you are a Drobo owner, the upgrade is free. With the new Dashboard, you can: (from ) View all your Drobos in one window Get capacity and status for each Drobo DroboCopy tasks run in the background Get email alerts about your Drobo Here is a good overview of the Drobo Dashboard v2 from Mario Blandini.   Tools From the Capacity and Tools option in the Dashboard select #160; This gives the user the ability to do several functional and maintenance #160; Blink the lights, rename the device, check for software updates, register your Drobo, perform some system diagnostics, shutdown your Drobo, format it and reset the unit. Let’s look at them one at a time! #160; Blink Lights – I’m sure there is a good reason to blink the lights on a Drobo, but this might be the least used function in the tools #160; I did it several time to impress my friends when on a Skype call, but that was #160; When selected, it will blink the light between red and green. #160; Rename Device – If I had two of the same unit or if I just wanted to rename my Drobo to “Bob” this would be the place. #160; Check for Updates – Between this post and the first one, Drobo upgraded the software to version !  The software does automatically check for updates, but in case you skipped it the last time, you can update it from #160; I was already up to date! #160; Register – Takes you to the Drobo site for registration of the #160; #160; Diags – Runs some very quick diagnostics and puts a log file to your desktop for #160; Support will most likely ask for this if you are experiencing #160; The file itself is unreadable by the end user. #160; Shutdown – Performs a clean shutdown of the unit. #160; Format – Use this to change the way the Drobo has been #160; For the purposes of this review, the Drobo was formatted into 4 – 2TB #160; Selecting the format option starts with a prompt warning you that all your data will be deleted. The rest of the process is similar to the format this is done when first installing the #160; See my first post here. #160; Reset – Made a horrible mistake and just need to start over?  This is your tool.   Drobo Copy Drobo Copy is a feature that enables you to easily backup files to your Drobo device. From this screen, you can add, edit, delete or run a Drobo Copy task. You can also view a report of the last run of a particular Drobo Copy task. Selecting the + option allows me to create a new copy object. I will rename the copy to ‘First Drobo Backup’ Select the source folder at my Documents Folder from my PC Select the destination folder as one of the Drobo volumes Leave the default time and days of the week to AM and All Days Basic View Advanced View In Advanced view, the options to include system files. Delete files in the ‘To’ folder that are not present in the ‘From’ folder, set the Reporting Level and add exclusions are #160; For the purposes of this review, they will remain default. This would be a very handy way to back up the files on your computer if you had no other form of back #160; Set up is very easy to use and understand as well as manage. To run the backup manually, use the ‘Run Now’ button at the bottom of the #160; Select ‘Edit’ to make changes to the scheduled jobs. One a job is run, the ‘Last Report” option is #160; When completed, it looks something like this.   From the Drobo Website: For Drobo Dashboard version or later: See Using Drobo Copy to Back Up Data in the Drobo Online User Guide. To create a new Drobo Copy, see Creating a New Drobo Copy in the Drobo Online User Guide. (Also see "Information for Advanced Settings" below in this article.) To run a Drobo Copy now (manually), see Running a Drobo Copy Now in the Drobo Online User Guide. To review a report of Drobo Copy activities, see Reviewing the Last Report for a Drobo Copy in the Drobo Online User Guide.   Dashboard Preferences There two options under the Dashboard Preferences – Dashboard Settings and Email Settings Under Dashboard Settings, a General Settings window #160; The options to Auto Update, Enable System Tray functionality (which means it is running even if the software is closed) and Alert #160; If I wanted to configure Email Alerts, I could do that in the Email Setting #160; This option is for more advanced users. More information on setting up Email Alerts can be found here.   Conclusion The upgrade to the Software was a huge improvement over the #160; A better interface, easier to use features and a more intuitive layout is a big plus for the average #160; There is no reason not to move to this version of the Drobo Dashboard and if you are just purchasing a Drobo, the dashboard should be a tremendous #160; Nice work Drobo! So what is next? In the next review, I will atake a look at how it can be used with different applications including Windows Home Server 2011 and Oracle’s Virtual Box. Jim Collison is a blogger and podcaster for and Full Disclosure – Drobo provided an evaluation unit with drives for this review.
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Drobo

Drobo Has a New Dashboard! Welcome Version 2.0 with a Drobo S and 5 Drives.

I have been reviewing a Drobo in some form or fashion since December #160; Some reviews over at the Home Server Show and some here at the Average #160; In recent months, Drobo has released a new version of their dashboard ( for this review) for both their consumer and enterprise #160; For a company that is taking steps in the right direction when it comes to back up hardware, this software upgrade replaces a fairly vanilla offering from the last several #160; It’s a definite upgrade and one that users of a Drobo should test out #160; I found no reasons not to #160; If you are a Drobo owner, the upgrade is free. With the new Dashboard, you can: (from ) View all your Drobos in one window Get capacity and status for each Drobo DroboCopy tasks run in the background Get email alerts about your Drobo Here is a good overview of the Drobo Dashboard v2 from Mario Blandini. This review was done on Windows 7 PC using a 5 bay Drobo S connected via USB   The Review The v2 software can be found at the Drobo support #160; #160; The install is fairly standard and I selected all the defaults. The Dashboard: (Click on any of the images to enlarge to viewable size) Icons View List View Both views give the ability to sort by Health, Name or #160; There is a graphical representation of the device in the lower left corner of the #160; Very handy to use if your Drobo is in another location and cannot be seen. Since the Drobo is empty of drives, we are going to add 5 of #160; 2 – 3TB, 2 -  and 1 – 1TB #160; I am going to load all of them at once. While the drives are being loaded by the Drobo, I get this warning message: The Drobo itself is flashing the yellow and green #160; This process is no different in previous versions of the dashboard, just a new way of alerting the user. Because the drives are not completely acquired by the unit, this alert occurs as well: It took the unit about 3 minutes to completely add all the #160; Now they need to be formatted. Icons View List View Selecting the first option, Capacity and Tools, I am prompted to format the #160; Selecting #160; A final warning before the format. Like in the previous version of the dashboard, there three different Format Types #160; For the purposes of this review, I am choosing the 2nd or NTFS option. In further reviews, I am going use the Drobo to test the new Windows Home Server 2011 with Oracle’s Virtual Box #160; For that purpose, I need 2TB #160; So for this review, I am choosing to create multiple 2TB #160; It would be just as easy to create a 4, 8 or 16TB volume right here with the slider. One of the handy features about the Drobo is that I can very easily set up the volumes once I chose their #160; I am going to change both the drive letters of the volumes as well as their #160; This will help in future reviews know which drive is which. Its important to remember that while I might have 4 – 2TB volumes, I really only have of capacity #160; If I loaded more than of data to these drives, the Drobo would require that I add larger drives to the #160; Before After And a #160; Selected Format The formatted look from the #160; Usage Option Capacity Option In order to complete the set up, the Drobo needed to be #160; This was accomplished in about 2 minutes time without rebooting the PC. Volumes Tab Status Tab Out of the box, the Drobo uses Beyond RAID to protect any data stored on the #160; By default on the Drobo S, one drive can fail without the loss of #160; In the Setting – General Tab, there is an option increase the number of drives that can fail at once to two #160; While it adds a greater amount of protection, it takes additional #160; Each user needs to evaluate their risk #160; Here is what it looks like if it’s turned on with this configuration. There are also two other options for power #160; The first one determines how quickly the disk spin down when they are not in #160; The default is 15 #160; The second is brightness of the #160; 1 is nearly off and 10 is #160; 10 is default.   By selecting the Dual Disk Redundancy, the drive capacity is almost cut in half with this configuration. With this configuration, it took the Drobo about 12 minutes to convert the disks. Before After Since I can risk having only one drive fail at a time, I am going to set the protection mode back to the default setting. This process took about 5 seconds to complete. So what is next? In the next set of reviews, we will look at The Tools available from within the Dashboard, Drobo Copy, the Dashboard Preferences and the Help available from the Drobo #160; I will also take a look at how it can be used with different applications including Windows Home Server 2011 and Oracle’s Virtual #160; Jim Collison is a blogger and podcaster for and Full Disclosure – Drobo provided an evaluation unit with drives for this review.
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Home Tech

The Drobo with Windows 7 / Head to Head with a WHS?

Have you been looking for a better way to back up your data other than an external hard drive?  So have many #160; Over the last 3 years, Microsoft has been developing and supporting a product to help you with not only backing up your PCs, but assist you with some network file #160; It’s called a Windows Home Server (WHS). Admittedly, I am a WHS enthusiast, blogger and podcaster and have a vested interested in the #160; In November, Microsoft pulled the Drive Extender (DE) functionality from the product and left the WHS community #160; Much of this has already been document on this topic and if you have fallen behind, here is a must read to catch #160; The short of it, is that the ability to use multiple hard drives in a single PC and have them seen as one volume and managed as a pool of drives is not longer going to be supported by Microsoft in the near future. For WHS enthusiasts, this was a blow! It begged the question, could there be something else that has similar functions and features of DE in WHS that I could use?  Could I replace DE in my WHS with something else?  With a little thought, a Drobo looked like a good candidate, so I contacted them, acquired some hardware and wrote these posts at the #160; While writing these posts, it became apparent that I might be able to replace the WHS completely with a Drobo and Windows 7 native #160; If that was the case, it deserved a #160; This is that journey. The first Drobo was released in 2004 and was similar to the model I am reviewing #160; In the last 6 years, Drobo has expanded their line of devices to include models with faster transfer speeds, more drive bays and different ways to connect to your #160; For the purposes of this review, I have a 2nd Generation Drobo (current retail is between $299 and $399) and am using the USB connection to my #160; You can find more info on Drobo and their other products at So to give it a fair shake, here the major features of a WHS. The Windows Home Server’s main features (from Microsoft) Media Server Store and organize digital memories and media in one central location. Stream the digital content to Media devices. Backup Software Effortlessly backup your home computers daily and automatically. Data Recovery Easily restore lost files or even entire hard drive contents in a few steps. Document Management Get complete access to files from both inside and outside the home. Remote Access Share photos and home videos with friends and family with the built-in secure and personalized website address. Add-ins Easily extend the capabilities of the Server using software add-ins. Expand storage capacity easily as your needs increase.   Let’s look at each one of these areas and see where the Drobo lines #160; First, we need to get the unit installed. The Drobo and Management Software Install In the box comes: #160; The Drobo (wrapped in a black cover that could be used later as a dust cover) #160; Power Cords, USB and Firewire 800 Cables #160; A resource CD and Documentation (the book is actually handy!)   Set up and configuration is #160; Pull all the contents out of the box, plug in the Drobo and it comes to #160; I connected the unit to my PC via USB (I don’t have a Firewire 800 port on my PC) and installed the software from the provided CD The install is very #160; Double click on the install icon and select all the #160; Here are some of the screen shots: One the install is complete, the unit is ready to accept drives. If you select Advanced Controls, you see a view of the Drobo and it’s drive #160; In this case, drives need to be added. I have 2 x Western Digital WD15EARS Drives and 2 x 1TB Western Digital WD10EARS Drives that will get inserted into the #160; When I inserted the first drive () into the top slot, the Drobo prompted me format the drives and to create a volume. Selected NTFS for Windows Vista PC Created a 16TB Volume Selected a Drive #160; I took the default. It formatted. Success! One thing to remember is that even though the Drobo creates a 16TB partition, it doesn’t mean you have 16TB of available #160; That is determined by the number and size of drives you put #160; So let’s put some drives in the #160; Below are the screen shots from each drive. [Click on each of the images for a larger view] Capacity images were created using Capacity Calculator at So with all four drives loaded, I have available out of the of actual #160; The space not available is used for data #160; Here is a look from the Drive Properties in Windows. So now we have 3TB of space for data that is redundant and #160; What can we do with it besides use it like a regular external drive?  Let’s look at how it would match up to the features of a Windows Home #160;   The Media Server – Store and organize digital memories and media in one central location. Stream the digital content to Media devices.   The first step in the process is to get the sharing permissions correct so that we can share files and folders across the #160; For the purposes of this review and simplicity, I am going to choose the least complex security and allow all users to access all network shared #160; There are several options that need to be changed in the control panel of Windows 7 On the PC that is going to host the Drobo, go to Control Panel\Network and Internet\Network and Sharing Center\Advanced sharing settings Select Choose media streaming options… Select Turn on media streaming I changed the name of the media library from my PC name to #160; It added several PCs from my network to the devices that would be allowed to access my #160; Select Ok. To make sure that the other users on my network don’t have to enter a password, I am going to turn off Password Protected #160; It’s more complex of a set up to have it on and I am not going to cover it here, but it is possible to insure that each user has permissions to the media. I created three folders on the #160; Music, Video and #160; So I could tell them apart when looking for them on various devices, I put Drobo in front of each title.     In Music, added music files and streamed both on the local PC and over the network. In Video, added a file that had been recorded with my HD Homerun in over the air #160; In Pictures, included a few pictures that were taken at #160; Was able to view them for various points on the network. Since video would be most affected when adding and removing hard drives from the Drobo (or a real hard drive failure), I added a new drive during the playback of recorded #160; A the same, I was copying an entire DVD to the #160; Added a 1TB Drive to Bay 3 Removed a Drive from Bay 1     Once I pulled the drive from Bay 1, the Drobo began to going to action to move the data that had been on Bay 1 to Bay 3 for #160; During the back up, the video still played (although there was some skipping in the playback) and still had access to the music and pictures #160; It would be safe to say that the Drobo can handle most of the media sharing ability that currently exist on a Windows Home #160; However, there are many factors that going streaming audio and video across a network so your experience may #160;   Backup Software – Effortlessly backup your home computers daily and automatically. When the Drobo is directly attached. Select Set up backup I will select the Drobo Choose the default method. It gives me the option to review the #160; I could change The frequency (daily, weekly, monthly) What day of the week (blank for daily, day for weekly and number for monthly) What time it backs up each day, on the hour. I then Selected Save setting and start a back up. Once the back up is complete, the Drobo then contains a back up #160; This image could be used to restore the PC in the event of a hard drive or loss of #160; Simply use the System Restore CD that was created the first time a back up was made, boot the new PC with the Drobo attached and restore the image from the Drobo. To back up other PCs on the network, I would simply create a back up folder that I would share across the #160; When selecting the destination location, I would choose network and store it there.   Document Management – Get complete access to files from both inside and outside the home.   Remote Access – Share photos and home videos with friends and family with the built-in secure and personalized website address.   Let’s get two for #160;  We have seen from the Media Server section, document management (of things like Word docs and Excel files for example) is not any different than hosting music or video #160; The real challenge would be the access of those file from outside the #160; This task is made very easy with the help of Window Live Mesh, part of the Windows Live Essentials suite of #160; Instructions to set up Live Essentials can be found #160; Windows Live Mesh allows you to both remote control a PC or have access to the files that are on that PC from a remote #160; To set this up, First open and log into Window Live Mesh on the PC with the Drobo. Then choose Sync a folder, found under the PC #160; In this case, I am going to Sync the Drobo Pictures #160; Select the folder and choose Sync. In this case, I am going to choose my SkyDrive #160; From there I could choose to share them with friends and family by using the share features that already exist with that #160; I am limited to 5GB of total space with this option. If you had files or pictures that you wanted to share with the same PC all the time, you could set the sync to go from PC to PC, say your PC to your parents #160; There would be no 5GB size limit in this #160; To view them on the web, go to and #160; I would select the PC that hosts the Drobo, in this case #160; Then choose Drobo Pictures.   And there are my #160; I have include a screen shot from both the Drobo and the SkyDrive From the SkyDrive From the Drobo   Add-ins – Easily extend the capabilities of the Server using software add-ins. Expand storage capacity easily as your needs increase.   One of the amazing features about the Windows Home Sever was it’s Add-in #160; The Add-in developers could extend the functionality and capabilities by writing specific applications on the Home Server #160; Many of these add-ins for free or very #160; Surprisingly, Drobo also has its own Apps that can be used with the #160; They can be found at #160; There are apps for both the Drobo and the Drobo FS.   Here are an example of a few:   DroboApps Admin Utility The DroboApps Admin Utility makes installing, configuring, updating, and uninstalling DroboApps even easier. It can temporarily disable a DroboApp to keep it from starting automatically. Apache Apache is a secure, efficient and extensible server that provides HTTP services in sync with the current HTTP standards. Firefly Firefly serves digital music residing on the Drobo FS to the Roku Soundbridge and iTunes. Lighttpd lighttpd is a HTTP server with a focus on security, speed, compliance, and flexibility. Unfsd UNFS3 is a user-space implementation of the NFSv3 server specification. It provides a daemon for the MOUNT and NFS protocols, which are used by NFS clients for accessing files on the server.   Conclusion   While not an exact replacement for a Windows Home Server in every way, a Drobo could replace most if not all of what is needed when using a Windows Home #160; Results can and will vary depending on one’s specific environment and there may be additional or other solutions that I didn’t consider in this #160; It should get you thinking!   Jim Collison is a blogger and podcaster for and Full Disclosure – Drobo provided an evaluation unit with drives for this review.
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Home Server Show

The Home Server Show Podcast CES 2011

We are back from CES and Las Vega with a few stories to tell!  If it happened in Vegas, you will know about it!  This Home Server Show podcast is a CES 2011 special with Dave, Jim and special guest star Chris #160;  We have recorded interviews with Drobo, Microsoft, and the CEO of Eye-Fi from Las Vegas.   Full show and show notes are at
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