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Five Gadgets To Help You Play Pokémon Go

By Emily Prokop from ; – Guest Writer Think Pokémon Go is going to get you out of the house and away from your gadgets? Think again! Don’t let the great outdoors stop you from looking for excuses to sneak a few more Amazon boxes on your front porch. Here are five gadgets to help you in your quest to catch ‘em all! Anker PowerCore 13400 Portable Charger While keeping the Pokémon Go app open all day while searching for Charmander  may not make a huge dent in your data plan, thankfully, it is a quick drain on your battery life. Carry around a portable charger, like the Anker PowerCore 13000, which I bought for my husband for Father’s Day, but am the current keeper of now that I am obsessed with actually leaving the comfort of my house in search of new Pokémon. At full power, the Anker PowerCore 13000 charges an iPhone 6s 5 times, a Galaxy S6 times or an iPad Air 2 once — you know, in case you decide to maybe check a work email now and then.
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Home Tech

How Can Solar Power Improve Our Future

If you listen to Home Gadget Geeks much, you know I am a big fan of solar ; While it is still too expensive and not cost effective here in Nebraska (getting better) it is catching on in places around the world and costs are dropping ; I think someday we will be able to get most if not all of our energy from renewable ; I was contacted by the Solar Action Alliance about partnering with them on a blog ; Below is the ; Would love your feedback on articles like ; Keep doing it?  Different topics?  Send me a note at Enjoy!
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Reviews & How-To

Hands On Review of the Intel Compute Stick Windows BOXSTCK1A32WFC: Episode II

By Bill Rockhold – Guest Writer Intel Compute Stick: Episode II In my last post on the Intel Compute Stick, ,  I had run into a couple of difficulties, but it had ended with a positive feeling. That didn’t last, shortly afterward the fit started to hit the shan. Windows 10 Install I had upgraded from Windows to Windows 10, which had seamed to go without any issues, but afterward I started to have some problems. I installed Handbrake, to use as a benchmark on CPU power. The app would crash every time I tried to run it. I have never had any problems running Handbrake on any computer before. I tried reinstalling the app, but I didn’t have any better success, so I dropped it to moved on to other things that I wanted to test. Back to Windows 7 Next I was going to install Windows 7 to see how Windows Media Center performed on the Compute Stick, but there was a big gotcha here. The USB flash drive installer wouldn’t even boot on the Compute Stick. The problem comes down to that the Compute Stick uses UEFI firmware and 32 bit Windows 7 only supports BIOS firmware machines. While researching the problem, I found that Microsoft had responded to the problem of installing Win7 on UEFI hardware by telling people to put the machine in BIOS mode. The Compute Stick doesn’t have a BIOS mode. I did find that there is a hack to install the 64bit version of Windows 7 on UEFI hardware, but nothing for 32 bit. I thought of trying to install Windows 7 on a different computer and then coping a drive image to the Compute Stick, but I didn’t want to go there and it is definitely beyond what an average user would try. I also thought about trying to install 64bit Windows using the hack, but seeing that Intel’s firmware seems to be picky on what Operating Systems it will allow to boot, I decided I wasn’t going to waste the time trying. Of course Microsoft had just discontinued Media Center for Windows a week or so before, so going back to Win and installing the PRO pack wouldn’t have gotten me anywhere ether. So the Media Center test is a write off. Next I installed an application called MatterControl which is my preferred app for controlling my 3D printer. The app installed fine and I was able to manually control the printer, but when ever I tried to start printing an object, the app would crash. I now had two apps that had never given me any problems on any other machine crashing on the Compute Stick. I decided to do a clean install of Windows 10 to make sure there wasn’t a problem with the upgrade. There have been reports of people having issues after doing the upgrade to Windows 10. I setup the Windows 10 installer on a USB flash drive and tried to do a clean install, but I couldn’t get the install to start. I tried it on another UEFI computer and the installer worked. So I decided to try to see where the recovery and repair tools would get me. Window’s tools wouldn’t allow me to do a recovery and when I tried to run a repair, it wouldn’t complete. I next tried the Windows 10 reset feature. I let it run for a day and a half before I rebooted the device and I ended up killing the installation completely. At this point I had completely toasted the operating system to the point that it wouldn’t even boot to the repair tools. Bricked? So the Compute Stick was all but bricked; I couldn’t get any version of Windows to install, even a Windows 32 bit version. This is where I’m thankful that I had used Ubuntu to make an image of the original installation when I first received the Compute Stick. I marked the UEFI setting change to boot Ubuntu and put the image file on a flash drive and went through the process of writing it back to the internal storage. It did take almost a day to complete, but it did competed. An after I switched back the OS boot setting I tried to boot windows and it failed with a problem with the boot sector. But I was able to get the Windows 10 repair tools from the USB installer to perform a repair on the boot sector and after a reboot Windows came up just like when I first got the Compute Stick. After all of this I have to say that I’m a bit disappointed with this device now. It performs well enough for what it is, but I think Intel cut too many corners when making this device. They seem to be trying to lock it to only a couple of selected operating systems and in the process making it difficult to install any other Operating System and then not providing any form of recovery software, not even at an extra cost. I’m at the point where I wouldn’t recommend the Compute Stick for any one who wants to do anything other than surf the web or stream video from Netflix or the like. For techie people who like to fiddle with the things, the Compute Stick makes things harder than they need to be. I haven’t totally given up yet. Now that I have Windows back on the device I’m going to try Handbrake and MatterContol again. I would still like to have a low power device to drive my 3D printer.
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Reviews & How-To

Hands on Review of the Summer Infant WideView Digital Color Video Baby Monitor

By Kyle Wilcox – Guest Writer As part of the Average Guy Tech Scholarship fund found at , I had three three baby monitors that I considered for the review: Angelcare AC1120 Video and Sound Monitor – Summer Infant Wide View Digital Color Video Baby Monitor – Motorola MBP33S Wireless Video Baby Monitor with Color LCD, Zoom and Enhanced Two-Way Audio – All three models seemed fairly similar and as of January 2016, each was selling for around $110. The decision to go with the Summer unit came down to the fact that it had a larger screen. First impressions are that while the WideView is made of plastic, it doesn’t feel cheap or flimsy the way some plastic products do. In the box you will find two power cords and they each have an icon on them indicating either the camera or the monitor unit. I plugged both in right away and got the video feed immediately. There was no pairing or other work necessary to get working. I browsed through the instruction manual and noted that it said to charge the monitor for 4-5 hours before first use. I just started using it right away. The Summer WideView is capable of connecting up to three additional cameras. I only have the one included camera and for my intended purposes, I don’t see a need to use more than that. The instructions show some basic things the monitor can do, but overall, the functionality is very simple and with the well labeled buttons, there is little to no use for the instructions unless you need to add another camera. In fact, there is a menu button on the monitor, and its sole purpose is to add, remove, or change cameras. I won’t be needing the menu button.   The monitor: I like that it is a widescreen format, measuring 5” diagonally. The screen resolution is pretty terrible when comparing it to your modern smartphone, but for a baby monitor, it should be fine. The kick stand is solid and functional, though it doesn’t allow the unit to tip back very far. On the right hand side is a zoom button, flanked on either side by brightness control buttons. There are only two zoom options: press the button once, and the camera zooms in, press it again and it returns to the original position. The brightness buttons just have up and down arrows on them, so it is not immediately clear what they are for, but pressing them brings up an onscreen symbol showing the brightness level, and you can see the picture increasing or decreasing in brightness. These brightness options should be more than sufficient for almost all lighting conditions that a baby monitor would be used in. The top right-hand side has clearly marked volume buttons. Top left is the power/menu button, and the left side has a button to activate the microphone. The charger also connects on the left side. Based on initial testing, it appears that the video quality will be sufficient for use as a baby monitor. You can see the child clearly enough to identify facial expressions. The camera also has a night vision mode that functions well in all but the darkest rooms. The most disappointing aspect of the baby monitor is the audio portion. The camera has microphone on it, and from what I can tell, there is no way to turn it off. Even in a room with no noticeable noise, the microphone still picks up a lot of background noise. On the monitor, this produces a very annoying static sound. I have just resorted to turning the volume down to silent. The product also mentions that you can use the microphone on the monitor to calm down your child by speaking to your child from the other room. However, this audio quality is also very bad and I can’t imagine a child finding it soothing; most likely they won’t even recognize your voice. There is one useful thing about the audio. Above video screen are lights that show the volume level in the room with the camera. This feature works even if the volume is turned all the way down. The lights turn on from left to right and turn from green to red. If you see all the lights on and red, your child is making a lot of noise. You can turn the video screen on and get a better picture of what that noise might be. Part 2 of this review will come as we actually use the monitor with our ; More to come…
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